9/9/2013

Slide-Guided Machining Centers for Hard Materials

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

The MCR series of slide-guided machining centers from Burkhardt+Weber is designed for use with hard and gummy materials such as Inconel, Duplex and Superduplex in oil and gas industry applications.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Related Suppliers

The MCR series of slide-guided machining centers from Burkhardt+Weber is designed for use with hard and gummy materials such as Inconel, Duplex and Superduplex in oil and gas industry applications. The series consists of eight models with various pallet sizes to accommodate parts weighing 1.5 to 40 tons. The machines feature an extra-wide slideway design for improved surface quality and increased rigidity and damping capabilities.

Spindles are equipped with a four-stage gearbox drive system providing 2,650 foot-pounds (3,600 Nm) of low-end torque and 107 hp (80 kW) constant duty. A CNC tool slide system supports the use of ITS-type boring bars or the company’s rigid facing heads. Multiple tool-insert configurations can be integrated on one slide. A rack-type tool magazine holds as many as 570 tools and automatically loads and unloads parallel to the machine’s cutting process without stopping the spindle from cutting.

RELATED CONTENT

  • When Spindle Speed is a Constraint

    Though it won’t replace high speed machining, Boeing sees “low speed machining” as a viable supplement to higher-rpm machines. Using new tools and techniques, a shop’s lower-rpm machining centers can realize much more of their potential productivity in milling aluminum aircraft parts.

  • Four Types Of Five-Axis Machining Centers

    Different machines offer different approaches to rotary travel, and each design has its own strengths. Here's how they compare.

  • Composites Machining for the F-35

    Lockheed Martin’s precision machining of composite skin sections for the F-35 provides part of the reason why this plane saves money for U.S. taxpayers. That machining makes the plane compelling in ways that have led other countries to take up some of the cost. Here is a look at a high-value, highly engineered machining process for the Joint Strike Fighter aircraft.

Resources