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10/16/2014

Sliding-Jaw Air Chuck Grips Square, Rectangular Parts

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Northfield Precision’s Model 870 sliding-jaw air chuck features two moving jaws for gripping square or rectangular parts with 0.0001 TIR.

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Northfield Precision’s Model 870 sliding-jaw air chuck features two moving jaws for gripping square or rectangular parts with 0.0001 TIR. The air-actuated chuck was developed for a custom application in which the customer requested Vee-block-type jaws to accommodate a range of drill sizes with each set of insert pads. The drill tip stops on the axial locator mounted to the face of the chuck, and the insert pads mounted in their subjaws clamp down on the OD of each drill while they grind its shank. The insert pad and subjaw arrangement enables quick change-over from size to size, the company says.

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