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Solid Carbide Drill Range Designed for ISO-M Materials

Dormer Pramet has extended its Solid Carbide Force X program with the Force M range, designed for stainless steel applications.

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Dormer Pramet has extended its solid carbide Force X brand with the Force M range designed for stainless steel applications. Force M drills feature internal coolant delivery in all sizes from 3 to 16 mm and from 1/8" to 5/8". The tools are available in 3×D and 5×D sizes, with either solid or coolant-through construction. The Force M assortment of drills are said to provide high productivity for drilling stainless steel (ISO-M) materials while operating consistently across a variety of machines and conditions.

All of the solid carbide Force M drills feature a modified four-facet, split-point geometry to enhance self-centering capabilities and improve hole quality. This split-point design is said to improve chip formation, tool strength and wear resistance specifically in ISO-M materials. Another feature of Force drills is Continuously Thinned Web (CTW) flute construction which, according to Dormer Pramet, offers a strong web design while at the same time reducing thrust forces during drilling. Combined with consistent edge preparation, which provides predictable wear, CTW is said to support a consistent and reliable drilling process.

Each drill in the Force M range is manufactured from micro-grain carbide along with a multilayered titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN) tool coating for hardness and toughness, resulting in higher wear resistance, longer tool life and higher productivity, says the company. A strong corner design is said to increase stability and reduce the forces encountered during drilling, especially during breakthrough at the exit surface in both general drilling and cross-hole applications.

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