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Static Toolholders Cut Down on Tool Indexing

Exsys Tool’s double square shank and quad square shank static toolholders accommodate two or four inserts, respectively, in a single tool turret station.

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Exsys Tool’s double square shank and quad square shank static toolholders accommodate two or four inserts, respectively, in a single tool turret station.

The Y-axis, OD cutting holders were developed for Mazak’s Quick Turn Nexus 200-II/250-II MY and MSY turning centers, which feature Y-axis cutting and VDI tool turrets. The 1" toolholders secure the inserts using high-force wedge assemblies. The shanks are solid and made from vibration-damping steel, a design that is said to provide consistent rigidity for aggressive turning applications.

Different types of inserts, such as those for roughing and those for finishing, can be located in the same tool turret station. The multiple-insert option is said to eliminate the need to index the machine turret from one insert to the next when inserts are located in separate stations, thereby decreasing time and cost while freeing up other stations.

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