• MMS Youtube
  • MMS Facebook
  • MMS Linkedin
  • MMS Twitter
3/5/2014

Turning Center Enables Off-Center Machining

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Okuma’s Genos L300-MY turning center features a Y axis for off-center milling, drilling and tapping capability.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Related Suppliers

Okuma’s Genos L300-MY turning center features a Y axis for off-center milling, drilling and tapping capability. The turning center accommodates workpieces ranging to 11.81" (300 mm) in diameter and 17.72" (450 mm) in length. Y-axis travel measures 3.94", while the Z-axis travel measures 17.7". Spindle speeds range from 25 to 3,000 rpm, or as fast as 4,500 rpm for milling. The tailstock quill diameter measures 3.54" (90 mm), and quill travel is 11 mm. The V12 M-turret accommodates 12 tools and offers a 0.2-sec. indexing time. The machine features a 10" three-jaw chuck, a contouring C axis and a manual touch presetter. The machine can be equipped with one radial and one axial live tool.

�

RELATED CONTENT

  • Applying Turn-Milling

    Combining a rotating tool with rotating work produces a machining operation that is distinct from standard turning or milling.

  • More Effective Camshaft Machining

    A leading manufacturer of high-performance valve train components installed a twin spindle/twin-turret lathe to bring camshaft machining work in-house. Here, the company explains how it has become more effective using its multifunction lathe to produce small batches of custom racing camshafts.

  • B-Axis Turn/Mills Have Their Place

    The additional rotary milling axis on these machines allows them to complete many types of complex parts in a single setup, but these machines have gained a reputation for being difficult to program. Today’s CAM software, however, eases the programming challenge significantly.

Related Topics

Resources