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12/28/2018

Viewing Software Facilitates On-Machine Die Inspection

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Vero Software’s Smirt 2019 R1 incorporates on-machine part inspection and optimizes process planning, tracking and shopfloor execution.

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Smirt 2019 R1, Vero Software’s viewing and manufacturing software for the die/mold industry, incorporates on-machine inspection and enhanced templating for added process planning automation, tracking and shopfloor execution.

The Smirt Inspect module enables on-machine part inspection for profile/periphery surfaces. The module uses Hexagon’s PC-DMIS for measurement and the NC Gateway for communication with the machine tool controller. Features include: automatic creation of inspection touch points based on user settings and profile curvature; collision detection as probe path and inspection points are created; easier addition and removal of inspection points; and automatic generation of text-based reports with inspection results. Postprocessing simultaneously generates machine tool commands and inspection feature data for PC-DMIS.

Building on the improvements of Smirt DieBuild and DbTemplateUtil released in 2017, users can automatically collect task surfaces based on the description of the item(s) mounted to it. Because of the updated planner feature, design files no longer need to contain special feature attributes to differentiate surfaces that may share the same color, direction or machining attribute.

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