11/15/2013

VMC Prewired for Fourth-, Fifth-Axis Applications

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The Ganesh VFM-4024 vertical machining center is available in both boxway and cross-roller linear way versions.

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The Ganesh VFM-4024 vertical machining center is available in both boxway and cross-roller linear way versions. The machine is prewired for fourth- and fifth-axis applications, and the company offers a complete line of fourth-axis rotary and fifth-axis trunnion tables as well.

X-, Y- and Z-axis travels measure 40" × 24" × 22", respectively. Both 40- and 50-taper spindles feature a precision dual-contact grind for high-performance milling and accurate cutting. Spindle speeds of 8,000, 12,000, 15,000 and 24,000 rpm are available, with chillers supplied on the high-speed spindles. The machine also is equipped with 300-psi through-spindle coolant, and 1,000-psi coolant is available as an option.

The VFM-4024 is fully enclosed, including top covers, and is available with either a FANUC or Mitsubishi M720 control. Options include a two-speed gearbox as well as tool and workpiece probing.

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