5/14/2010

VIDEO: Pocketing Steel - 0.030” DOC

with Toroid End Mill and RHINO-CARB™ Inserts from Dapra
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(Sponsored Content) This video demonstrates Dapra's 1" Toroid End Mill executing a pocketing routine in steel. The material is 4140PH (30 Rc), and the machine tool used is a Fadal 4020 with a 40-taper spindle with .030" DOC.

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Pocketing Steel - .030” DOC with Toroid End Mill and RHINO-CARB™ Inserts from Dapra



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This video demonstrates Dapra's 1" Toroid End Mill executing a pocketing routine in steel. The material is 4140PH (30 Rc), and the machine tool used is a Fadal 4020 with a 40-taper spindle. 
 
This particular pocketing routine utilizes a smaller IC insert (3/8") at a fine pitch for more feed capability at a lighter depth of cut. This method is usually preferred on lighter-duty (40-taper, linear ways) machines, as it allows the machine to function within its designed capabilities. 
 
The parameters for this video are:
Pocketing Steel - 0.030" DOC
1" Toroid End Mill - 3 Flute
H13 Material
700 SFM (2700 RPM)
.022" IPT (180 IPM)
.030" DOC
60% WOC
40 Taper VMC
 
 
For more cutting demonstrations, please visit Dapra’s Tool Demo Site (http://www.dapra.com/tech/videos.htm)

 

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