8/12/2015 | 1 MINUTE READ

Drawing Millennials to Manufacturing

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

The best endorsement for choosing advanced manufacturing as a career path may well come from those who have already entered the field and are now reaping the rewards.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon
�

It is projected that more than 6,000 positions in advanced manufacturing will be open in Northern Kentucky by 2022.

Reaching out to millennials—those born between 1980 and 2000—is critical to the future of manufacturing. One way to do so involves sharing the testimonials of those within that age group who’ve already begun successful careers in advanced manufacturing. That’s the mission of the Advanced Manufacturing Workforce Development Coalition of Northern Kentucky, which has launched a marketing campaign targeting millennials that could be a model for other states.

The coalition is co-chaired by industry leaders, including regional entities involved in workforce development, which developed the campaign to find job-seekers to fill a multitude of advanced manufacturing jobs in the region. The $110,000 campaign includes $80,000 in funding through a grant obtained by Gateway Community and Technical College.

The target of the initial campaign is 18- to 30-year-old men and women who live in the region. It will utilize digital advertising, radio and TV commercials, advertising on Transit Authority of Northern Kentucky (TANK) buses and Pandora Internet radio, as well as T-shirts and posters. The campaign is reaching out with voices of people who have already chosen advanced manufacturing proclaiming, “I made it in NKY.”

Rose Communications surveyed young people currently working in advanced manufacturing in Northern Kentucky. “What our team learned through these surveys is that these young men and women see great opportunities for themselves to have rewarding careers,” says Mike Vogt, co-chair of the coalition and vice president of human resources and general affairs for Mazak Corp., which makes advanced turning and milling machines at its Florence headquarters.

It is projected that more than 6,000 positions in advanced manufacturing will be open in Northern Kentucky by 2022. Learn more about the program by watching this short video

RELATED CONTENT

  • For This Mold Shop, the Key to Closing the Skills Gap is Emotional Intelligence

    Thanks to a culture change founded on a commitment to emotional intelligence, this mold supplier solved its skilled labor problem and increased throughput per employee.

  • Developing Shopfloor Talent: Why "Vocational" Is Not a Dirty Word in Europe

    Employing apprentices is a smart move because they can be trained to develop exactly the skills and knowledge your company wants them to have. But how do you find these apprentices and why does this concept work better in some countries than in others? A closer look at the German system and the Grob Group’s approach to training, which has replicated its Germany apprenticeship approach in the United States, reveals some insights.

  • Does This School Have the Formula for Mfg Education?

    A high school in Wisconsin runs its manufacturing vocational program as a business. Students make parts for paying customers. The program is thriving, cash flow is strong, and local manufacturers can now hire recent graduates who already have experience in meeting customer demands.

Related Topics

Resources