4/18/2017 | 1 MINUTE READ

Stratasys Partners with UK Manufacturing Technology Centre

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The partnership is intended to support the latter organization’s role to research and advise industry on additive manufacturing’s capabilities.

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Stratasys Ltd. (Rehevot, Israel) has partnered with the United Kingdom’s Manufacturing Technology Centre (MTC), to spearhead the organization’s objective to demonstrate new processes and technologies that overcome barriers and push the boundaries of traditional manufacturing on an industrial scale. According to Stratasys, it will work closely with MTC to make additive manufacturing central to the projects undertaken in conjunction with its members, supporting the organization’s role to research and advise industry on the technology’s capabilities across multiple platforms.

Operating from its facility in Coventry, the MTC is part of the High Value Manufacturing Catapult, which is supported by Innovate UK, the government agency tasked with identifying and driving science and technology innovations that will grow the UK economy.

“We aim to inspire great British manufacturing on the global stage and central to achieving this are our partnerships with leading technology providers like Stratasys, through whom we are deploying some of the world’s most advanced, market-disruptive 3D printing based technology solutions,” says Ross Trepleton, group technology manager of component technology at MTC.

“Working with Stratasys, we have a clear objective to demonstrate additive manufacturing technology’s existing capabilities to our members and explore the opportunity to push the envelope in other areas,” he adds. “This includes the ability to produce end-use engineering components, as well as the capability to build complex parts with multiple materials and give multi-functionality to a single component, using 3D printing. We’re also looking at the potential to functionally grade parts by material composition.”

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