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4/12/2013

CNC Automatic Lathe for Precision Parts

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Marubeni’s R07 Cincom sliding-headstock-type CNC lathe offers a maximum machining diameter of 7 mm.

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Marubeni’s R07 Cincom sliding-headstock-type CNC lathe offers a maximum machining diameter of 7 mm. Designed for small-diameter parts, the lathe accommodates a range of high-precision workpieces for specialized parts.

 

The subspindle delivers 10,000 rpm, and a compact rotary guide bushing unit enables metalcutting speeds as fast as 12,000 rpm. Without the rotary guide bushing, cutting speeds can be as fast as 16,000 rpm. The lathe uses linear motors to drive the slide and toolposts for faster part processing and quieter operation. A scale feedback control system also is used with all axes.

 

Rotary tools are part of the lathe’s gang toolpost, enabling the machining of small-diameter parts requiring processes such as polygon turning and end-face drilling. The machine uses two independent toolposts to increase operation efficiency, the company says. The chuck also can be opened or closed without decreasing the speed of the spindle motor, reducing non-cutting idle time.

 

An optional ALPS automatic bar loader is designed to grasp and feed small wire-like bars into the machine. A vacuum-type part-removal system and carousel workpiece separator also are available.

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