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Grinder Simplifies Automotive Engine Part Production

IMTS 2018: Meccanica Nova’s Novamatic 2G internal grinding machine grinds multiple bores of an automotive engine component in one work part clamping.

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Meccanica Nova’s Novamatic 2G internal grinding machine grinds multiple bores of an automotive engine component in one part clamping. An internally-mounted FANUC robot loads and unloads workpieces.

The company’s ID grinders are flexible, agile, high-production grinding machines with various workholding packages and wheel dressing options for parts ranging from 5 to 420 mm. The grinders are said to speed setups and change-overs, simplify maintenance, reduce cycle times and improve throughput.

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