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High-Penetration Insert Designed for Structural Steel

Allied Machine & Engineering has released an addition to the Gen3sys XT Pro line of high-penetration inserts. designed for the structural-steel market.

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Allied Machine & Engineering has released an addition to the Gen3sys XT Pro line of high-penetration inserts designed specifically for beam and plate production in the structural-steel market. With a combination of substrate and multilayer coating, the insert is engineered to withstand heat generated while drilling in structural-steel beams or plates in high-production facilities. Optimized in their existing structural steel holders, Allied’s high-tech structural steel insert is said to improve chip formation and reduce vibrations, creating a higher-quality hole.

The composition of its carbide grade, geometry and high-temperature coating are designed to run at or beyond current rates from original equipment manufacturers while offering extended tool life. The insert’s simplified setup and extended tool life reduces change-over and increases throughput. The company says the insert is designed to improve run rates, reduce tool failures and increase capacity.

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