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Kaast's C-Turn Teach-Style Lathes Feature Vibration-Damping Construction

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Kaast C-Turn

Lathes in Kaast Machine Tools’ C-Turn series are made with high-tensile-strength Meehanite castings for vibration damping. These teach-style lathes can repeat long strings of directions for multiple reproductions. The Fagor 8055i/A TC control panel provides a conversational graphical interface which does not require the user to have a prior CNC programming or G-code background, the company says. For those who wish, programmable logic and ISO (G-code) control are also fully integrated.

All slide ways and drive elements are automatically lubricated, and the undersides of the saddle and the cross slide are coated with Turcite-B to ensure accuracy and long component life. The headstock also features forced lubrication and an oil bath.

The main spindle bores, machined and ground from a single forging, range from 3" to 14". Double-chuck systems are also available. The spindle and gears are made of carburized and ground CrMO steel. The three-point support on the spindle is said to ensure accuracy and rigidity. Three automatic toolchanger systems are available as options (H4, V8 or V12). The lathes also include a built-in tool library for easier tool management.

C-Turn lathes have electronic hand wheels for manual operation, with a simple and intuitive DRO mode, the company says.

 

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