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9/25/2015

Laser Cutting System Maintains Workpiece Alignment

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The Laser Photonics’ Titan 5×10 high-power fiber laser cutting system is designed for cutting reflective materials like copper, brass, aluminum and stainless steel.

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The Laser Photonics’ Titan 5×10 high-power fiber laser cutting system is designed for cutting reflective materials like copper, brass, aluminum and stainless steel. This laser cutting machine features options for Ytterbium laser power ranging from 2 to 5 kW, a fully enclosed Class I safety system and water-cooled operation in addition to a small heat-affected zone. It performs high-pressure, nitrogen, argon or oxygen gas-assisted cutting. The 1,064-Nm laser provides high-quality cuts.

LiteBridge technology reduces the weight of the processing bridge while incorporating zero-friction, direct-drive motion systems along the gantry with its true orthogonal mechanization. These elements combine for rapid traverse speeds across the entire working surface and higher acceleration rates with pinpoint Laser-Beam placement verification helping keep thin metal materials in perfect alignment, according to the company.

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