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8/27/2013

Machine-Ready Blanks Reduce Setup Time

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TCI Precision Metals offers high-precision machine-ready blanks said to increase throughput.

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TCI Precision Metals offers high-precision machine-ready blanks said to increase throughput. According to the company, the custom blanks arrive ready to be loaded into CNC machining centers, eliminating the need for in-house sawing, grinding, flattening and squaring operations, as well as outside processing. Each aluminum, stainless steel or alloy blank is deburred and cleaned prior to shipment. The blanks are produced to customer specifications and are said to be as close as ±0.0005" dimensionally and 0.0002" in flatness, squareness and parallelism. 

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