Matsuura's New Five-Axis VMC Features Expanded Workpiece Capacity

Originally titled 'Five-Axis VMC Features Expanded Workpiece Capacity'

Making its debut in the United States this year, the MAM72-70V from Matsuura Machinery is a high-speed, large-capacity five-axis VMC. 

Making its debut in the United States this year, the MAM72-70V from Matsuura Machinery is a high-speed, large-capacity five-axis VMC. 

“The MAM72-70V is designed to handle a greater workpiece size than Matsuura’s existing models, offers faster response times and delivers higher productivity,” says David Hudson, vice president of sales and marketing. The machine features a maximum workpiece capacity of 700 × 500 mm (diameter × height), with a load capacity of 500 kg per pallet. These dimensions represent an 11 percent increase in part capacity, a 43 percent increase in weight and a 38 percent increase in envelope volume compared to the MAM72-63V.

A newly developed fourth/fifth-axis table, equipped with a roller gear drive for the fourth axis and direct-drive motor for the fifth axis, achieves rapid traverse rates of 50 rpm and 100 rpm, respectively. 

Improvements to the MAM72 structure promote ergonomic operation and easier access for setup and maintenance. The distance from the machine front (oil pan edge) to the pallet center is now 620 mm.

The MAM72-70V is described as “IoT-ready,” offering measurable remote and real-time monitoring of the machine’s status, condition and performance. 

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