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Multi-Axis Rotary Tables Can Be Assembled in 240 Configurations

The PL Lehmann 500 series of modular multi-axis rotary tables, available in North America through Exsys, can upgrade a VMC to increase productivity without the expense of a new machine.

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The PL Lehmann 500 series of modular multi-axis rotary tables, available in North America through Exsys, can upgrade a VMC to increase productivity without the expense of a new machine. The tables are available in four basic models and can be assembled into as many as 240 different configurations, making them adaptable to many workpieces and production situations. More than 20 different clamping methods and behind-the-spindle accessories extend the system’s adaptability, including rotary unions, special clamping cylinders and angular position measuring systems.

The rotary tables encompass four standard single fourth-axis models. The EA 507 is the smallest size with a face diameter of 70 mm (3") and a spindle nose load capacity of approximately 240 lbs. The 510, 520 and 530 models progress in size and load capacity, and the high-speed EA 511 delivers double the rpm of the standard models.

Each of these table models can be ganged together with multiple spindles or C axes next to one another. They can also be configured as multiple-axis systems that provide 180-degree A-axis tilt motion along with the C-axis rotation.

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