10/10/2016

Tough Handheld Alloy Analyzer Endures Rough Environments

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The KT-100 Katana from Rigaku Analytical Devices is said to be the only handheld alloy analyzer certified to strict MIL-STD-810G standards.

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The KT-100 Katana from Rigaku Analytical Devices is said to be the only handheld alloy analyzer certified to strict MIL-STD-810G standards: the industry’s first drop-tested analyzer for metal and alloy identification in industrial environments. 

The handheld, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analyzer is applicable for metal fabrication, positive material identification in petrochemical plants and scrap metal sorting requiring fast, accurate and robust methods for alloy identification to promote profitability and product quality. The analyzer is designed for use in scrap yards, plant environments and fabrication shops, and features an IP54 rating for use in wet environments.

The KT-100 Katana is designed for on-the-spot metals classification, including aluminum grades, and features QuickID software. The analyzer offers auto surface preparation with its DrillDown feature and features an extended battery life. GPS enables instrument tracking.

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