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5/21/2018

Clamping System's Lock-Down Force Prevents Vibration

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Kurt Manufacturing Co.’s pneumatic Zero-Point clamping system runs on existing shop air supply.

Kurt Manufacturing Co.’s pneumatic Zero-Point clamping system runs on existing shop air supply. The DockLock Airline system reduces setup time through rapid change-out of large and small machine fixtures. It features a tapered plug design to aid in positioning and clamping.

The system uses a form-fitting clamping design with self-locking clamp segments and tapered plug design. This creates three-surface contact and lock-down force, completely pulling the plugs into the cylinders. According to the company, its design prevents vibration and tilting, important for five-axis and horizontal machining centers. The system applies 2,880 lbs of pull-in force and 9,000 lbs of retention force to hold the docking system in place.

The system’s flanged cylinders and tapered plugs can be incorporated into fixturing systems or integrated into preconfigured base plates and pallets. Additional features include air-blast cleaning to remove debris from the flange, mechanical clamping and air unclamping, compact tapered plug design, and pallet monitoring ports for adding sensors.

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