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7/6/2017

End Mill for High-Feed Milling in Hardened Steels

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Seco Tools has released a new solid carbide end mill designed to boost metal removal rates and extend tool life.

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Seco Tools has released a new solid carbide end mill designed to boost metal removal rates and extend tool life. The Jabro-HFM JHF181 is ideal for high-feed milling strategies in hardened steels and nickel-based alloys.

As the latest addition to the Seco high-feed family, the Jabro-HFM JHF181 offers the same performance as other of the company’s high-feed tooling solutions while increasing metal removal rates by as much as 30 percent over traditional methods, the company says. The JHF181 is especially effective at machining complex parts that require long tool overhangs and a mix of multiple axial and radial machining operations. It is also said to provide tool life as much as 30 percent longer than other comparable solid-carbide end mills when processing ISO H materials. With Seco’s HXT coating, the JHF181 provides a hard layer that delivers advanced thermal protection and high wear resistance.

The JHF181 is available in two-, four- or five-flute options with cutting diameters ranging from 0.0787" to 0.6299" (2 to 16 mm) and length options ranging from 2×D to 7×D. This end mill also has through-tool coolant capability for diameters from 0.2362" to 0.4724" (6 to 12 mm).

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