• MMS Youtube
  • MMS Facebook
  • MMS Linkedin
  • MMS Twitter
1/20/2016 | 1 MINUTE READ

Grinding Machine Can Grind Complete Crankshaft in Single Setup

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Junker offers its Jucrank platform for cylindrical and non-cylindrical grinding with a swing diameter of 470 mm and a part length capacity ranging to 4,800 mm.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Related Suppliers

Junker offers its Jucrank platform for cylindrical and non-cylindrical grinding with a swing diameter of 470 mm and a part length capacity ranging to 4,800 mm. Initially designed for grinding and re-grinding of large crankshafts, the machine can also be used for grinding printing rollers, electric motor shafts and other heavy workpieces.

To ease part setup, the Jucrank has a slide with an integrated length measuring system that enables the technician to first bring the work heads into position, and then the steady rests. This machine’s CNC steady rests have only one axis each, increasing their stability and stiffness. Each of as many as 11 steady rests can be controlled individually and applied to a section at any time, even during the grinding process, for greater flexibility. This capability is supported by a high-performance control system supporting at least 24 CNC axes.

An integrated measuring system helps prevent scrapping of forged and hardened workpieces such as crankshafts and enables completing grinding in one setup. The system measures main and pin bearing diameters during the grinding process, and measures the entire workpiece afterward including the taper of each element, bearing widths and lift heights. Based on the measuring data, the machine finishes the grinding process while using the WK axis, which swivels the grinding spindle, compensating for tapers in the process. The grinding machine can therefore provide each main and pin bearing with its own profile shape, and then grind the two shaft ends, if required. 

RELATED CONTENT

  • A Model Camshaft Grinding Process

    Optimizing a camshaft lobe grinding cycle has traditionally been based less on science and more on educated guesswork and numerous test grinds. Now, computer thermal modeling software can predict areas where lobe burning is likely to occur, in order to determine the fastest possible work speed that won't thermally damage lobes and greatly reduce the number of requisite test grinds.

  • Centerless Grinding: Not Magic!

    Achieving consistent and quality results from the centerless grinding process requires an understanding of the basic fundamentals. Most application problems associated with centerless grinding derive from a misunderstanding of the basics. This article explains why the centerless process works and how to use it most effectively in your shop.

  • Advanced Grinding, Plain and Simple

    Advanced grinding equipment gives this shop the flexibility and automation it needs to serve customers with either rapid-response or high-volume jobs.

Related Topics

Resources