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3/20/2019

Horizontal Machining Center Provides Rigidity, Support

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Eastec 2019: Takumi USA’s H12 double column machining center is designed for parts that require speed and accuracy, such as die/mold, aerospace and other high-speed applications.

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Takumi USA’s H12 double column machining center (distributed by Brooks Associates) is designed for parts that require speed and accuracy, such as die/mold, aerospace and other high-speed applications. The ladder structure and double-column design are said to provide rigidity and support to the head casting. The machining center features a 15,000-rpm Big Plus CAT 40 inline direct-drive spindle. The one-piece base absorbs the inertia of high cutting feeds, and 30 components on the machine are hand scraped for alignment during assembly. The machine features a table that measures 59.1" × 37.8" and can handle a load size of as much as 5,512 lbs. Also, its axis travels measure 53.2" × 37.4" × 23.6".

The machine is equipped with the FANUC 31-i-MB control that features AICC 2 with high-speed processing, machine condition selection and Nano smoothing. The control includes 600-block lookahead and a 1-GB data server with editing capabilities.

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