2/9/2018

Mandrel's Segmented Clamping Bushing Damps Vibration

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Hainbuch America offers a high-precision segmented mandrel designed for machining complex aerospace parts.

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Hainbuch America will be exhibiting new technology at IMTS 2020 in Chicago this September.

Plan to meet up with their team or get registered here!

Hainbuch America offers a high-precision segmented mandrel designed for machining complex aerospace parts. The Mando Adapt is said to deliver fast, reliable and accurate change-over from OD to ID clamping using the company’s Today, Tonight, Tomorrow modular system. It has a concentricity of 0.005 mm between chuck taper and mandrel taper when turning. On stationary clamping devices, it can achieve repeatability of 0.003 mm without readjusting, according to the company

The segmented mandrel uses a vulcanized, segmented clamping bushing made of case-hardened chromium-nickel-steel for a large clamping range and vibration damping along with segments designed for rigidity and wear resistance. The device exposes more of the part for machining without sacrificing holding power or accuracy. It has a clamping range accommodating diameters between 8 and 190 mm. Its standard segmented clamping bushings and workpiece end stops enable machining to size.

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