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Micromachining Center for Die/Mold Applications

Available from Methods Machine Tools, the Yasda YMC 430 Ver. II micromachining center is designed for precise manufacturing and high-quality surface finishes required on small, complex features in components, dies and molds for applications in the medical and semiconductor industries.
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Available from Methods Machine Tools, the Yasda YMC 430 Ver. II micromachining center is designed for precise manufacturing and high-quality surface finishes required on small, complex features in components, dies and molds for applications in the medical and semiconductor industries.

The machining center is equipped with a high-speed, HSK-E32 spindle that provides speeds ranging to 40,000 rpm. Designed and manufactured by Yasda, the spindle is said to minimize vibration and offer high reliability and repeatability in micro-milling applications such as roughing and finishing hardened steel. X-, Y- and Z-axis travels measure 16.5" × 11.8" × 9.8" (420 × 300 × 250 mm), and the worktable is 23.6" × 13.8" (600 × 350 mm). The automatic toolchanger holds 32 tools, and a 90-tool configuration is also available. The machine also is equipped with a FANUC 31i-Model B5 control.

The micromachining center’s linear-motor-driven controlled axes and rigid structure are said to damp vibration and improve speed, precision and surface quality. Linear motor drives include optical scales that support and sustain submicron milling performance.  The machine’s rigid, symmetric H-shaped frame design and thermal distortion stabilizing system provide consistency and repeatability, and linear positioning and circularity accuracy of less than 1 micron can be achieved, the company says.

The machine is available with three- or five-axis capabilities. In the five-axis configuration, it is equipped with a direct-drive-motor-driven, high-precision tilting rotary table to multi-face indexing and machining, as well as simultaneous five-axis machining without re-chucking.

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