12/1/2009 | 1 MINUTE READ

Milling Toolholders Reduce Vibrations

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Although long-overhang tools can reach deep cavities and other difficult-to-access areas, such cutters can introduce vibration into the machining process. To address this issue, Seco Tools’ Steadyline vibration-damping shell mill holders feature a passive dynamic damping system that offers as much as 3× the rigidity of common solid holders.

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Although long-overhang tools can reach deep cavities and other difficult-to-access areas, such cutters can introduce vibration into the machining process. To address this issue, Seco Tools’ Steadyline vibration-damping shell mill holders feature a passive dynamic damping system that offers as much as 3× the rigidity of common solid holders. This results in greater productivity, longer tool life and improved quality, the company says.

The vibration absorber is positioned at the front of the bar, where deflection is the highest. This feature dampens vibrations as soon as they are transmitted by the cutting tool to the bar body and prevents vibrations from spreading, thus limiting deflection of the tool at overhangs ranging to 5×D. This allows increased cutting speeds and depth of cut compared to a modular system.

Featuring coolant channels, the high-tensile-coated steel shell mill holders are dynamically balanced and ready to use out of the box. They are available in a range of types and sizes, including cylindrical and tapered form, CAT, HSK, Seco-Capto, Din and BT. They are suited for milling operations involving long overhangs and predominantly radial forces; deep mold and die workpieces; and complex, monolithic workpieces, such as those used in aerospace, automotive and power-generation applications.

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