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Multi-Spindle Lathe Completes Complex Parts at High Volumes

IMTS 2018: Index’s MS40-8 multi-spindle automatic lathe with eight CNC spindles has been designed for high-volume precision work in the automotive, fastener, connector and aerospace industries.

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Index’s MS40-8 multi-spindle automatic lathe with eight CNC spindles has been designed for high-volume work in the automotive, fastener, connector and aerospace industries. The machine features two back-working spindles with up to 18 X-axis and Z-axis CNC slides and additional Y axes if required. 

The machine can process chucked workpieces or bar stock through the company’s MBL40-8 bar loader, also on display. The 110-mm chuck enables machining of pre-formed, forged or extruded parts ranging to 80 mm. For simple parts, the machine can be used as a double four-spindle machine, reducing cycle times.

The compact spindle drum with eight fluid-cooled motorized spindles achieves up to 7,000 rpm, 24 kW and 57 Nm. The spindles are designed for speed control, high torque, compact size and limited maintenance.

Built to complete complex parts in one setup, the machine features as many as two pivoting synchronized spindles able to work on as many as seven rear-side machining tools, four of them live. Two rear-side machining tools can work simultaneously on the workpiece.

Each spindle is independently programmable, enabling users to modify parameters to machine difficult materials. Drum indexing makes speed changes possible. Users can set up live tools on the compound slides, enabling a range of operations such as off-center drilling, thread cutting and more.

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