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8/18/2009

Turning On A Machining Center

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VIDEO. Part of Renishaw’s automated production process, this turning operation uses tools affixed to the machining center’s table while the workpiece is mounted in the spindle.

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An automated production process on machining centers at Renishaw’s UK manufacturing facility uses those machining centers even to perform turning.

The overall process goes by the acronym RAMTIC, for Renishaw’s Automated Milling, Turning and Inspection Center. An article under “Editor Picks” at right describes the process in more detail.

The machining-center turning operation, show in this video, uses stationary cutting tools mounted on the table. The workpiece loads in the spindle using toolholder-like shanks. The workpiece length is then measured using a toolsetting probe.

To turn the part, the machining center feeds it (while it’s spinning) against the stationary cutting tool. Y-Z interpolation permits precisely contoured turned profiles.

 

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