• MMS Youtube
  • MMS Facebook
  • MMS Linkedin
  • MMS Twitter
2/4/2009

Video: Five-Axis Milling On Linear-Motor Machining Center

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Linear motors take the place of ballscrews on this machine performing high speed cutting of aluminum at a job shop near Atlanta.

Loading the player ...


five-axis linear motor machining center

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Related Suppliers

Here is video footage of a five-axis machining cycle at GTI, an aerospace-industry job shop near Atlanta. The machine here, a model HSC 105V “Linear” machining center from DMG, features linear motors in place of ballscrews for fast acceleration, particularly during high speed cutting of aluminum. GTI’s version of the machine has a 28,000-rpm spindle. With C-axis travel of 360 degrees, the machine easily reaches all the way around the part, while the A-axis travel of well over 180 degrees allows the machine to perform undercuts. The video shows this.

RELATED CONTENT

  • Composites Machining for the F-35

    Lockheed Martin’s precision machining of composite skin sections for the F-35 provides part of the reason why this plane saves money for U.S. taxpayers. That machining makes the plane compelling in ways that have led other countries to take up some of the cost. Here is a look at a high-value, highly engineered machining process for the Joint Strike Fighter aircraft.

  • How One Shop Machines Advanced Ceramics

    Years of trial and error combined with the appropriate machining technology allow this company to produce custom parts made of alumina, zirconia, boron nitride and other advanced ceramic materials. One example of key machining technology is a five-axis machining center used exclusively to produce the complex, tightly toleranced geometry that fire-hardened workpieces require.

  • Four Types Of Five-Axis Machining Centers

    Different machines offer different approaches to rotary travel, and each design has its own strengths. Here's how they compare.