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Video: Five-Axis Milling On Linear-Motor Machining Center

Linear motors take the place of ballscrews on this machine performing high speed cutting of aluminum at a job shop near Atlanta.
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Here is video footage of a five-axis machining cycle at GTI, an aerospace-industry job shop near Atlanta. The machine here, a model HSC 105V “Linear” machining center from DMG, features linear motors in place of ballscrews for fast acceleration, particularly during high speed cutting of aluminum. GTI’s version of the machine has a 28,000-rpm spindle. With C-axis travel of 360 degrees, the machine easily reaches all the way around the part, while the A-axis travel of well over 180 degrees allows the machine to perform undercuts. The video shows this.

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