2/24/2015

Case Study: Chip Conveyor System Saves Floor Space

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Hennig explains how its CDF system is used to remove a variety of chips and save space for Advanced Machine and Engineering in this short video case study.

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Hennig Inc. put together this video case study that shows how Advanced Machine and Engineering used the Hennig CDF (chip disc filtration) system to effectively remove chips when cutting tombstones and save floor space.

About 34 seconds into the video, Brad Patterson, director of operations and continuous improvement at Advanced Machine and Engineering, says AME purchased a Toyoda machine to improve on-time delivery of workholding products. Since the machine can run lights-out, it was important to make sure the total package—including the chip conveyor—was working as needed.

What’s special about this particular application is that floor space was a major constraint. Also, the machine is used to cut cast iron, steel and aluminum materials, producing anywhere from cast fines to long, stringy chips. According to Scott Cooley, business unit manager – chip conveyor and filtration systems at Hennig, AME needed a hinged belt conveyor system as opposed to the standard scraper design. By using the Hennig CDF, the company was able to save more than 2 feet of space from the standard design.

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