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Video: Machine Shop in San Quentin Prison

The TV program “Titan” will become more directly focused on machining instruction as its creator incorporates his teaching in the prison into the show.
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The TV program “Titans of CNC”—formerly “Titan: American Built”—posted the promo above of its upcoming third season. Titan Gilroy, the show’s star and creator, has obtained permission to establish a modern CNC machining program within San Quentin State Prison and film there. This video shows the new San Quentin machine shop taking shape, as Mr. Gilroy (himself a former prison inmate) works alongside inmates to renovate and equip the space, and prepare the new CNC shop for the instruction of students.

In a Facebook post, Mr. Gilroy says he designed the curriculum for the prison machining program himself and will personally teach the inmate students to “machine aggressively so they can really secure jobs and solve employer and customer problems.” His instruction of inmates will be a recurring part of the show, and he intends for his show to be more directly focused on machining instruction going forward. The show’s name change reflects this change in direction. Machining professionals, students and maker enthusiasts will all be able to benefit from the teaching he gives as part of the show, he says, and this will be supplemented by complementary videos related to machining practice on the show’s website.

“Titans of CNC” airs on MAV-TV. Modern Machine Shop published this profile of Mr. Gilroy near the beginning of season two of his show.

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