• MMS Youtube
  • MMS Facebook
  • MMS Linkedin
  • MMS Twitter
12/13/2016

Bourn & Koch Acquires Manufacturer of Waterjet Orifices, Nozzles

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Diamond Technology Innovations also makes 3D printer nozzles.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Related Suppliers

Bourn & Koch (Rockford, Illinois), a subsidiary of Alleghany Capital Corp., has acquired Diamond Technology Innovations (DTI; Olympia, Washington), a manufacturer of waterjet orifices, nozzles and related products.

“The acquisition of DTI enhances Bourn & Koch’s existing business in machine tool consumables and spare parts, and provides an entrance into the waterjet market,” says Terry Derrico, Bourn & Koch president. “Waterjet is one of the faster-growing segments within the machine tool industry,” he adds.

Ted Jernigan, president of DTI, will continue in his role, and the company’s day-to-day operations will not be impacted by the transaction, according to Bourn & Koch.

DTI offers a variety of waterjet orifice materials including low-cost, short-life ruby and sapphire; mid-grade, low-cost/high-performance TetraCore; and premium-grade DTICore Diamond. In addition to orifices, the company has also created nozzles for the 3D printing industry. And in 2010, the company designed and manufactured diamond nozzles for NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which are still in use on the Mars Curiosity Rover today. 

RELATED CONTENT

  • Why Not Start With Waterjet?

    In titanium, significant savings and process efficiency can result from the simple fact that abrasive waterjet cutting leaves the remaining stock intact.

  • The Laser’s Role In Micromachining Metals

    A new laser technology combines the high machining accuracy and throughput required for precision, industrial micromachining work.

  • Setting the Stage for Sizeable Composites Work

    By adding a five-axis waterjet/milling machine, its biggest autoclave and a more expansive lay-up room, Royal Engineered Composites is positioning itself to win larger-scale aerospace work it sees on the horizon.

Related Topics

Resources