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Coordinate Metrology Society Establishes Two-Tier CMM Certification

The first level certification is comprised of an online test, while the second level is a test of at least 400 hours of CMM expertise.

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The Coordinate Metrology Society (CMS) has launched the industry’s first Level-One and Level-Two Certifications for traditional coordinate measuring machine (CMM) professionals. Applicants for the CMS Level-One Certification must submit an application, meet eligibility requirements, sign the CMS code of ethics and pass a peer review. Candidates for the CMS Level-Two Certification must possess a Level-One Certification, have two years experience using a CMM (minimum 400 hours) and submit an application with two references who can confirm their expertise. Both examinations will be conducted by CMS-authorized proctors.

Qualifying candidates will be notified and scheduled for an examination slot at the upcoming Coordinate Metrology Society Conference scheduled for July 2020. Certification guidelines, fees, and application forms are available at cmsc.org

The Level-One Certification examination is a proctored, online assessment consisting of about 200 multiple-choice questions covering foundational theory and practice common to most traditional CMMs. Additionally, the CMS offers a device-specific CMS Level-Two Certification examination, which is a practical, hands-on performance assessment for CMM operators. Once an application is processed and approved, the assessment can also be scheduled throughout the year at an authorized CMS Assessment Facility in various North American locations. Additional fees may apply.

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