L.S. Starrett Co. Appoints North American Director of Sales, Industrial Products

Jon-Michael Raymond succeeds Tony Aspin, who will be retiring June 30 after serving the company for 28 years, the last 18 of them as vice president of sales.

The L.S. Starrett Co., a manufacturer of precision measuring tools, gages and metrology systems, has appointed Jon-Michael Raymond director of sales of industrial products for North America. He will be responsible for sales of the company’s core products including precision measuring tools and gages, hand tools, and saw blades.

Mr. Raymond succeeds Tony Aspin, who will be retiring June 30 after serving the company for 28 years, the last 18 of them as vice president of sales. Mr. Aspin and Mr. Raymond will be working together on a transition plan until the end of June. 

Douglas A. Starrett, president and CEO, says that Mr. Raymond “brings a strong sales and marketing background as well as experience with distribution and end users, and will be instrumental in growing the sales of our broad range of products in North America. We welcome him to the Starrett team and wish Tony Aspin the best in his retirement.”

Mr. Raymond has worked in the Industrial marketspace for over 12 years, working the past three years serving as vice president of sales for Pferd Inc. He has also held various sales and finance positions for Osborn and Norton | Saint-Gobain Abrasives.

Editor Pick

There’s a Micrometer for That

Match your micrometer choice to your specific machine shop needs.

RELATED CONTENT

  • 3D Scanning: Reproducing One-Of-A-Kind Prototypes

    A laser scanning system helps this shop capture the free-form surfaces on a hand-sculpted original. The resulting digitized models are the basis for CAM applications such as programming a CNC machining center. 

  • How Accurate Is Your Machining Center?

    Virtually every machine tool builder lists, as part of a machine's specification, accuracy and repeatability figures. What's generally not given is the method used to arrive at the figures. Though these methods are defined in linear positioning standards, not all builders use the same standards.

  • Going Lean in Order to Grow

    This shop has a plan for dramatically expanding its contract machining business in high-value markets.