L.S. Starrett Co. Appoints North American Director of Sales, Industrial Products

Jon-Michael Raymond succeeds Tony Aspin, who will be retiring June 30 after serving the company for 28 years, the last 18 of them as vice president of sales.

The L.S. Starrett Co., a manufacturer of precision measuring tools, gages and metrology systems, has appointed Jon-Michael Raymond director of sales of industrial products for North America. He will be responsible for sales of the company’s core products including precision measuring tools and gages, hand tools, and saw blades.

Mr. Raymond succeeds Tony Aspin, who will be retiring June 30 after serving the company for 28 years, the last 18 of them as vice president of sales. Mr. Aspin and Mr. Raymond will be working together on a transition plan until the end of June. 

Douglas A. Starrett, president and CEO, says that Mr. Raymond “brings a strong sales and marketing background as well as experience with distribution and end users, and will be instrumental in growing the sales of our broad range of products in North America. We welcome him to the Starrett team and wish Tony Aspin the best in his retirement.”

Mr. Raymond has worked in the Industrial marketspace for over 12 years, working the past three years serving as vice president of sales for Pferd Inc. He has also held various sales and finance positions for Osborn and Norton | Saint-Gobain Abrasives.

Editor Pick

There’s a Micrometer for That

Match your micrometer choice to your specific machine shop needs.

RELATED CONTENT

  • Working With Your Working Gage Blocks

    The uses of working gage blocks are as varied as the number of gage blocks in a large set. The working blocks have an intermediate grade and are often used in the inspection or calibration lab, but they may also be found on the shop floor.

  • Gaging Countersunk And Chamfered Holes

    While countersunk and chamfered holes are similar in appearance, functionally they are quite different. Consequently, different gages exist to serve these different functional requirements.

  • Surface Texture From Ra to Rz

    The irregularity of a machined surface is the result of the machining process, including the choice of tool; feed and speed of the tool; machine geometry; and environmental conditions. This irregularity consists of high and low spots machined into a surface by the tool bit or a grinding wheel.