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Automated Recycling System Performs Filtration in Two Phases

IMTS 2018: Eriez’s Portable SumpDoc enables shop personnel to position the unit alongside the machine tool sump and treat the existing coolant, all during machine tool operation.
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Eriez’s Portable SumpDoc enables shop personnel to position the unit alongside the machine tool sump and treat the existing coolant, all during machine tool operation. The fluid recycling system is automated and filters dirty sump coolant in a two-phase process. In the first phase, it vacuums out chips and sludge at a rate of 85 gpm (50 microns). In the second phase, it filters fine solid particulate to 3 to 5 microns and removes tramp oils to less than 0.5 percent at flow rates of 90 to 120 gallons per hour. Depending on the regularity of cleaning, a 200-gallon sump can be processed in about 2 hours. The system has onboard hookups and extensions to receive compressed air and 120-V, single-phase electric.

Features include touchscreen controls; hoses, couplings and floats; a vacuum that removes large chips and heavy sludge; a cartridge filter that removes fine-solid particulate; a centrifuge that removes emulsified oils from coolants; an ozone generator that provides biological control; a tank and pump for tramp oils; and utility hookups.

Optional equipment includes a high-speed, self-cleaning centrifuge and a coolant make-up system. The centrifuge has a disposal tank with level sensors and a discharge pump. The coolant make-up system includes a coolant concentrate holding tank, a gear concentrate pump and a digital hand-held refractometer.

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