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2/8/2018

CMM Provides In-Process Measurement without Setup, Breakdown

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Smart Manufacturing Experience 2018: The Mach Ko-ga-me coordinate measuring machine (CMM) from Mitutoyo is designed to be fast, compact, lightweight and easy to mount, making it suitable for automated cells. 

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The Mach Ko-ga-me coordinate measuring machine (CMM) from Mitutoyo is designed to be fast, compact, lightweight and easy to mount, making it suitable for automated cells. 

The company guarantees temperature accuracy from 10° to 35°C for flexibility and performance. It can be mounted on on the machine tool frame. It provides CMM capabilities without the space requirements of a full-sized machine as well as in-process measurement without setup and breakdown, according to the company. The three-axis CNC measuring head is designed for accuracy, speed and flexibility for a range of configurations and inspection applications both in the lab and during the manufacturing process. As a standalone inspection system in the quality lab or in the manufacturing environment it functions like any other CMM, measuring parts individually or with part programs. As a process inspection system within computer-integrated manufacturing (CIM), it can be implemented near-line with human part loading or in-line with robotic part loading for automated closed-loop control process.

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