CNC Turning Centers Designed for Multitasking

Hyundai-WIA’s L2100Y/SY series of CNC multitasking turning centers feature a wedge-type Y axis and BMT 65 (VDI 140) turret to complete complex milling and turning operations in a single setup.

Hyundai-WIA’s L2100Y/SY series of CNC multitasking turning centers feature a wedge-type Y axis and BMT 65 (VDI 140) turret to complete complex milling and turning operations in a single setup. The synchronized main spindle and subspindle enable high-precision machining of the front and back of cylindrical parts. The turning centers are designed for small- to medium-sized job shops but are capable of accommodating high-production environments, the company says.

 

The machines offer a 630-mm swing over the bed and a 300-mm swing over the carriage, as well as a maximum turning diameter of 335 mm and a maximum turning length of 463 mm (455 mm for the SY). The turning centers are equipped with a gearless 4,500-rpm, 8" main spindle. The spindle is said to deliver minimal noise and vibration for stable machining and durability. The 6" subspindle with C axis offers 0.001-degree indexing and is driven by the B-axis ballscrew and servomotor. Both spindles are controlled with the C axis. Contour machining with the C axis is also possible for machining outer shapes and pockets using live tools and the Y axis.

 

Critical structural components are composed of Meehanite cast iron to minimize deformation when performing heavy-duty cuts. To prevent thermal growth during machining, all axes are driven by high precision double-nut ballscrews connected directly to the servodrive motors without gears or belts. The machining centers are equipped with a 12-station BMT turret driven by a high-torque servomotor with a 0.4 sec. indexing time in either direction. The FANUC 32i-A series CNC features a 10.4" color LCD with Manual Guide i.

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