• MMS Youtube
  • MMS Facebook
  • MMS Linkedin
  • MMS Twitter
2/14/2019

Measurement Software Runs Hypothetical Process Scenarios

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

MeasurLink 9 software, developed by Mitutoyo America Corp., provides real-time statistical process control and data collection.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

MeasurLink 9 software, developed by Mitutoyo America Corp., provides real-time statistical process control and data collection.

The updated program supports Windows, enables single sign-on for team, groups and companies, runs hypothetical scenarios in Process Analyzer, and displays dynamic data from a data source in high sampling rates.

The software updates also include:

  • An uncertainty chart for a visual representation of how the gage performance affects measurement and updates
  • The ability to copy/paste gage R&R data
  • Improved gage management because of the ability to import information (and calibration data) from an external source
  • Automatic identification of characteristics during data collection based on tolerancing
  • Better traceability to ensure proper data recording for serial numbers

RELATED CONTENT

  • Measuring Part Geometry On The Shop Floor

    Measuring workpiece dimensions is relatively simple for machine operators but measuring workpiece geometry which involves more complex comparisons of part shape to an ideal shape--is now also practical on the shop floor. The gaging equipment for doing this is coming down in price while becoming easier to use.

  • Raising the Bar with Ballbar Testing

    Few manufacturing companies rely on ballbar testing to maintain machine tool accuracy as thoroughly as Silfex. Now, advanced training and a move to a Renishaw QC20-W wireless system have enabled the company to take the benefits of ballbar testing to a higher level.

  • How Accurate Is Your Machining Center?

    Virtually every machine tool builder lists, as part of a machine's specification, accuracy and repeatability figures. What's generally not given is the method used to arrive at the figures. Though these methods are defined in linear positioning standards, not all builders use the same standards.

Resources