3/5/2019

Digital Video System Measures Vertically or Horizontally

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Eastec 2019: Starrett's HVR100 Flip digital video system is billed as the industry’s first vision system to work upright (vertically) or on its side (horizontally) for application versatility.

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The L. S. Starrett will be exhibiting new technology at IMTS 2020 in Chicago this September.

Plan to meet up with their team or get registered here!

The L.S. Starrett Co. will be exhibiting a range of products, from vision technology and optical measuring systems to force testing equipment, surface measurement, hardness testing, electronic digital measuring tools and wireless data collection to support manufacturing’s transition to Industry 4.0. 

Starrett's video-based measurement products will feature the HVR100 Flip digital video system, billed as the industry’s first vision system to work upright (vertically) or on its side (horizontally) for application versatility. The HVR100 provides rapid measurement results and features a large field of view, automatic part recognition, and powerful, easy-to-use measuring tools, according to the company..

Also on display will be Starrett’s AVR300 automatic vision system for repetitive measurements and automatic comparison to CAD files; entry-level L1 computer-based force testing technology; and other metrology equipment. 

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