} Disc Erosion Machine for PCD-Tipped Tools | Modern Machine Shop
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Disc Erosion Machine for PCD-Tipped Tools

Vollmer’s QXD 250 disc erosion machine enables complete machining of PCD-tipped tools from measurement through polishing in a single clamping arrangement.

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Vollmer’s QXD 250 disc erosion machine enables complete machining of PCD-tipped tools from measurement through polishing in a single clamping arrangement. Designed for use with hard cutting materials, the generator uses a fine, precise erosion pulse capable of creating surfaces ranging to 0.1 µRa. According to the company, the machine offers increased speed, sharpening and flexibility in the production of PCD tools. It is equipped with Vpulse EDM erosion generator for cost-efficient machining.

The disc erosion machine offers simultaneous path operation in six CNC axes, including the A axis. X-, Y- and Z-axis travels measure 520 × 970 × 420 mm and rapid traverse rates are 100, 200 and 200 mm/sec., respectively. The machine rotates 360 degrees in the A axis, ±20 degrees in the B axis and 210 degrees in the E axis. Rapid traverse rates for the A, B and E axes are 1,500 degrees/sec., 10 degrees/sec. and 180 degrees/sec., respectively. The 4,500-rpm spindle provides 6 Nm of torque. The integrated toolchanger accommodates six erosion, grinding or polishing wheels with diameters ranging to 200 mm.

The N 261 and N 265 workpiece storage systems provide space for as many as 28 or 63 workpieces, respectively, and can be loaded or unloaded during machining. Extended travel distances and swivel ranges are designed to accommodate workpieces ranging to ranging to 320 mm in diameter and 250 mm long, weighing as much as 25 kg.

Vollmer’s ExLevel Pro operating concept features a modular design for needs-based installation. A range of applications for simulating, measuring, eroding and grinding are offered, and tool-based programing is still possible. The software’s 3D-View provides collision monitoring for safety.

 

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