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5/17/2017

Double-Column Machining Centers Deliver High Accuracy

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Amerimold 2017: Extremely rigid and thermally stable, the Takumi H series of double-column machining centers are designed for parts that require high accuracy and surface finish in die/mold, aerospace and other high-speed applications.

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Extremely rigid and thermally stable, the Takumi H series of double-column machining centers are designed for parts that require high accuracy and surface finish in die/mold, aerospace and other high-speed applications. The H10 has XYZ travels of 40" × 27" × 19"; a 30-station swing-arm automatic toolchanger; and inline, direct-drive, high-speed Big Plus spindles; as well as 30-bar (435-psi) coolant-through spindles and linear scales.

Mechanical design features of H series machines include ladder design of the cross rails, which provides a rigid support for the saddle and head, and prevents deformation in the vertical axis, thus allowing for faster speeds and highly accurate 3D surfacing operations. The close proximity of the spindle to the bridge casting reduces overhang. The one-piece base design also absorbs the thrust force of the table, which prevents the column distortion found on typical C-frame machines. Roller-type rails on all axes increase rigidity and enable high table loads compared to ball-type guides.

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