11/29/2016

Five-Axis HMC’s Solid Machine Base Enables Tough Cutting of Exotic Metals

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Toyoda’s FA1050 five-axis HMC is said to provide a solid base, the highest metal removal rate in its class and low required maintenance, leading to longer tool and machine life.

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Toyoda’s FA1050 five-axis HMC is said to provide a solid base, the highest metal removal rate in its class and low required maintenance, leading to longer tool and machine life. The machine performs boring, end milling, finish cutting, threading and U-axis machining while maintaining accuracy.

To provide the longest possible machine life and minimize tool breakage and upkeep, the machine is equipped with a solid cast iron base combined with a full-plate clamping mechanism withstanding as much as 26,000 lbs of table clamp force. According to the company, operators can expect to achieve stable axial feed at high speeds—590 ipm on the X, Y and Z axes—during heavy workloads thanks to the machine’s rigid core.

Spindle support from four heavy-duty bearings, including robust double-row cylindrical roller bearings and dual angular contact thrust bearings, eliminates vibration. The boxway machine enables rapid acceleration and consistency with its 60-hp spindle drive motor at 6,000 rpm, the geared head further enabling tough cutting operations.

Because unstable machining on difficult metals is a recipe for disaster, the FA1050’s solid structure secures versatile, accurate, competitive machining on difficult materials such as Hastelloy, Inconel and Nichrome among other exotic metals, the company says.

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