10/12/2015

Handheld Probe CMM Requires No Programming Experience

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Keyence’s XM-series handheld probe coordinate measuring machine (CMM) is intended to be an easy-to-install option for entry-level operators who need to perform 3D measurements with high accuracy.

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Keyence’s XM-series handheld probe coordinate measuring machine (CMM) is intended to be an easy-to-install option for entry-level operators who need to perform 3D measurements with high accuracy. The CMM performs high-precision measurements using an onscreen interactive visual guide and touch probe for intuitive operation. According to Keyence, the portable machine can be used in a variety of manufacturing environments and doesn’t require a foundation or any ancillary equipment. The system can operate in environments with temperatures ranging from 50° to 95°F and relative humidity ranging from 20 to 80 percent.

According to the company, no previous CMM programming experience is needed to operate the XM. Users select desired measurement parameters and measure the target with the probe to complete programming. Augmented-reality guidance images are created automatically, and the system overlays the measurement points along with their 3D elements. Shared programmed work instructions and measurement promote consistent measurement regardless of the operator, environment or other circumstances. All measurement results are automatically recorded and saved.

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