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2/6/2018

Heat-Resistant Insert Grade Improves Tool Life

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Seco offers the MP2050 insert grade intended to optimize the balance of toughness and wear resistance to efficiently machine high-strength, heat-resistant materials.

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Seco offers the MP2050 insert grade intended to optimize the balance of toughness and wear resistance to efficiently machine high-strength, heat-resistant materials. Originally developed for turbine blade machining in the power generation industry, the new grade also excels in aerospace applications. It is effective in milling materials such as austenitic and martensitic stainless steels as well as titanium.

A completely new substrate and post treatment enhance the grade’s capabilities to handle high heat in the cutting zone. These features also prevent chip adhesion and cutting edge buildup for high process stability and predictability. The combined reliability of the substrate and wear resistance in the coating overcomes unstable machining conditions such as those involving interrupted cuts, long tool overhangs and weak fixturing. Additionally, the grade reduces tool costs by increasing tool life, and it enables cutting parameters to be increased, even in dry machining conditions.

The grade range includes round inserts in sizes of 10, 12, 16 and 20 mm. Also available are high-feed inserts; square shoulder inserts for the company’s Turbo, Square 6 and Square T4 lines; and face milling inserts for its Double Octomill.

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