9/11/2015

HMC Features Quill Spindle for Boring Oilfield Parts

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The quill spindle model of Mitsui Seiki’s HU100 heavy-duty HMCs is designed for precision boring of large parts in energy-related as well as other industries.

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The quill spindle model of Mitsui Seiki’s HU100 heavy-duty HMCs is designed for precision boring of large parts in energy-related as well as other industries. The machine’s quill spindle configuration is well-suited for boring valves and fittings in addition to other fluid-transfer components. The 4.4" (110-mm)-diameter quill has a W-axis stroke of 12" (300 mm) and delivers hole pitch accuracy within 1.5 microns and hexagon angle error within 0.002 degrees. With maximum/continuous power of 47/29 hp (25/22 kW) and maximum/continuous torque of 873/737 foot-pounds (1,184/1,000 Nm), the machine spindle offers speeds ranging from 15 to 3,000 rpm.

The HMC features XY-axis stroke of 40" (1,000 mm) and Z stroke of 52" (1,300 mm), and a 40" × 40" (1,000 × 1,000 mm) table that can handle a 6,600-lb (3,000-kg) maximum workload. The work envelope has capacity for workpieces as large as 60" (1,500 mm) in diameter. A variety of increased strokes and weight capacities are available. The rigidity, squareness and parallelism of the machine’s construction are said to provide positioning accuracy of 3 microns. A standard 60-tool-capacity automatic toolchanger adds flexibility and extends machine uptime.

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