• MMS Youtube
  • MMS Facebook
  • MMS Linkedin
  • MMS Twitter
9/1/2018

HMC Promotes Higher Throughput per Spindle

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

IMTS 2018: 

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

FFG MAG is debuting its MMH 500 horizontal machining center for the general market, designed with precision, power, performance and productivity in mind. All MMH machines come with linear axis speeds of 60 m/min. and a 12,000-rpm direct-drive spindle (optional 15,000 rpm) which results in more machine throughput per spindle and high-speed cutting capabilities. The high-pressure coolant-through tool/spindle-ready feature provides flexibility to application changes with the ability to apply 1,000 psi at a small upgrade cost. The large tool capacity enables more application possibilities on one machine.

The MAG MMH 500’s standard infinite contouring B-axis table delivers higher precision part cutting without having to add this typically-expensive option. The machine is prepared for 480-V connection, requiring no isolation transformers, saving users valuable floor space and investment cost, according to the company. Unlike many other horizontal machining centers in the market, MAG’s MMH 500 is designed and built with North American Controls Design and Safety Standards, which fully conforms to the latest U.S., Canadian and Mexican safety standards.

RELATED CONTENT

  • How One Shop Machines Advanced Ceramics

    Years of trial and error combined with the appropriate machining technology allow this company to produce custom parts made of alumina, zirconia, boron nitride and other advanced ceramic materials. One example of key machining technology is a five-axis machining center used exclusively to produce the complex, tightly toleranced geometry that fire-hardened workpieces require.

  • Composites Machining for the F-35

    Lockheed Martin’s precision machining of composite skin sections for the F-35 provides part of the reason why this plane saves money for U.S. taxpayers. That machining makes the plane compelling in ways that have led other countries to take up some of the cost. Here is a look at a high-value, highly engineered machining process for the Joint Strike Fighter aircraft.

  • Drilling Deep Holes On A VMC

    The recipe for best results is simple: Start with a rigid machine, add a high pressure through-the-spindle coolant system, then combine these with the right drill geometry plus the right speeds and feeds.

Resources