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11/18/2015

Machining Center Can Hone Cylindrical Bores in Single Setup

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Heller’s H-series machining center is said to reduce tooling and machine costs by machining cylindrical bores complete from raw part to precise, controllable tolerances in a single setup.

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Heller’s H-series machining center is said to reduce tooling and machine costs by machining cylindrical bores complete from raw part to precise, controllable tolerances in a single setup. Deployed on the four-axis machining center, Heller’s NCU out-facing head is prepared for honing and can adjust the size, taper, surface and tolerance of a bore as it changes the size of the tool during the honing process. A Marposs in-process gage is incorporated into the head, and the company collaborated with Diahon to program honing cycles that permit helical slide honing.

According to the company, the machine can create a continuous cross grind that can usually be produced only on honing machines. Unlike honing machines, however, it can produce bores with a cylinder form tolerance of 1 micron over a length of 300 mm, eliminating the typical three-pass honing process.

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