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11/26/2013 | 1 MINUTE READ

Multitasking Machine Enables Five-Axis Simultaneous Milling

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EMCO Maier’s Hyperturn 65 Powermill multitasking machine features a counter spindle for four-axis machining and a B axis with a direct drive for five-axis simultaneous milling operations.

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EMCO Maier’s Hyperturn 65 Powermill multitasking machine features a counter spindle for four-axis machining and a B axis with a direct drive for five-axis simultaneous milling operations. Turning, drilling, milling and gear-cutting operations can be carried out in one setup on the machine. It is said to be well-suited for serial production of workpieces, such as those in the automotive, mechanical engineering and materials handling, and aerospace industries.

With a spindle distance of 1,300 mm, the multitasking machine offers clearance for simultaneous machining on the main and counter spindles. The 29-kW, 12,000-rpm main spindle provides 79 Nm of torque. Featuring an HSK-T63 tool interface, this spindle can be used for both turning and milling or drilling work. It can be continuously swiveled ±120 degrees and clamped anywhere, and offers a Y-axis travel of +120/-100 mm. With 29 kW and 250 Nm of torque, the counter spindle is capable of machining the workpiece simultaneously with two tools for increased productivity. The machine can be equipped with a 20-tool pick-up magazine or a 40- or 80-tool chain magazine.

The multitasking center’s B axis direct drive provides contour capabilities with five-axis simultaneous machining, as well as shorter tool-change times. The Y axis realized by two interpolating axes distributes cutting force in two levels and adds stability for heavy-duty turning and milling. The lower turret with integrated milling drive can be used for milling operations at all 12 positions, combined with a Y axis for ±50 mm travel. The machine also is equipped with the Sinumerik 840D-sl control unit from Siemens.

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