6/17/2019 | 1 MINUTE READ

Pramet's ISBN10 Enables Various High-Feed Milling Techniques

Originally titled 'Cutter Enables Various High-Feed Milling Techniques'
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Pramet’s ISBN10 cutters are suitable for high feed milling, copy milling, ramping, helical interpolation, slotting and plunging.

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Pramet’s ISBN10 cutters are suitable for high-feed milling, copy milling, ramping, helical interpolation, slotting and plunging. The pocket design, in combination with the ANHX10 insert, enables it to perform shoulder and face milling, making the ISBN10 suitable for a variety of die/mold applications. Diameters are available from 0.625" to 1.500" and in multiple tool types, including parallel, modular shanks and shell mills.

To go with the ISBN10, Pramet also offers the BNGX10, a double-sided insert with four cutting edges. The design makes it suitable for high-feed roughing with long overhangs while also offering three geometries covering most materials. Geometry M is for steels and cast irons; MM is for low carbon steels, stainless steels and super alloys; and HM is suitable for hardened materials.

Inserts are available for finishing operations in shoulder milling for wall and bottom finishing. The single-sided insert has two cutting edges and a positive geometry for long overhangs, decreasing vibrations and reducing noise.

Both types of inserts are said to offer a smooth cut, while a through-coolant design directs lubrication nearer to the cutting edge. This allows for high feed rates with axial depth of cut ranging to 0.040". The HFC design has a low setting angle, stretching the feed over a larger cutting edge and reducing the thickness of the chip while allowing for higher feed rates.

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