Pressed Insert Cutting Edge

Dapra’s Toroid Rhino-Carb CNC pressed insert line is available with the Neutral (“N”) geometry for round and octagonal inserts.

Related Topics:

Dapra’s Toroid Rhino-Carb CNC pressed insert line is available with the Neutral (“N”) geometry for round and octagonal inserts. According to the company, the cutting edge geometry provides smoother cutting action for steels, irons and stainless steels compared to the company’s stronger T-Land insert edge. Neutral inserts also offer a higher positive edge preparation and rake angle than their T-Land counterparts. This creates less heat and pressure, while also offering greater strength than the very high-positive dished cutting edge.
 
Other Toroid Rhino-Carb cutting edge options include the T-Land and Dished geometries. T-Land (“T”) inserts feature the strongest cutting edge and should be used for the heaviest cuts or where vibration or chatter could cause edge damage. This geometry is suitable for steels, irons and 400-series stainless. Dished (“D”) inserts are suitable for applications in which low tool pressure and higher shear are required. This geometry is suited for most stainless steels and high-temperature alloys, but it is also a free-cutting performer in softer steels, the company says.

Related Suppliers

Editor Pick

Gearless Multi-Spindle Machining Center Heads for High Production

The multi-spindle heads are custom made in numerous spindle pattern configurations to meet specific manufacturing needs.

RELATED CONTENT

  • Start With The Right Speeds And Feeds

    Running rotary milling cutters at the proper speeds and feeds is critical to obtaining long tool life and superior results, and a good place to start is with the manufacturer's recommendations. These formulas and tips provide useful guidelines.

  • A Practical Guide To Presetters

    Tool measurement devices help shops save time, control runout and improve tool management.

  • Taking The Fear Out Of Hard Turning

    To make the transition to hard turning, you'll need to switch from carbide to CBN inserts, but that is easier (and more economical) than you might think. It's making the jump to much higher surface speeds that might scare you off. It needn't. Here's why.